Continuing with our mission to merge art and science, this issue’s cover was inspired by the Art Nouveau movement. Though it had a brief life, beginning at the end of the 19th century and losing popularity by the 1920s, Art Nouveau reflected a major shift in the way that art was created and viewed throughout Europe. The artistic masters of the day wanted to eschew the stark imitations of form and the exclusivity that had previously characterized “fine art”. Instead, art became something to be casually consumed and used in a practical fashion, as its manifestation in posters, advertisements and urban infrastructure attests. This notion of moving away from the traditions of the past and making knowledge more accessible is particularly relevant to our theme this issue. Young scientists find themselves in a new era, one that is rife with the potential - and the need - for change in the ways that we practice, review, teach and disseminate science.
Continuing with our mission to merge art and science, this issue’s cover was inspired by Art Nouveau. Though it had a brief life, Art Nouveau reflected a major shift in the way that art was created and viewed throughout Europe. The artistic masters of the day wanted to eschew the stark imitations of form and the exclusivity that had previously characterized “fine art”. Instead, art became something to be casually consumed and used in a practical fashion, as its manifestation in posters, advertisements and urban infrastructure attests. This notion of moving away from the traditions of the past and making knowledge more accessible is particularly relevant to our theme this issue. Young scientists find themselves in a new era, one that is rife with the potential – and the need – for change in the ways that we practice, review, teach and disseminate science.
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Kieran Manion

Design Director
Kieran Manion is a senior PhD student studying the breakdown of B cell tolerance in systemic lupus erythematosus in the Department of Immunology at the University of Toronto. In her spare time, she practises using digital platforms for general artwork and graphic design.
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The newest issue of IMMpress is now available! This time, we tackled all things work culture, from universal basic income to unions and more! Check it out by clicking the link below https://t.co/dDatJRPNi8 https://t.co/2scopoDpCU
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Check out the link in our below to read the newest IMMpress blog post! Our DOI undergrads Rahman and Aly did a great job on this one 🤩 https://t.co/yeTs2q6S7x
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